10/07/07

On the other side of the napkin, it cannot possibly be helpful to know what anything is.

As a matter of course, any human upbringing is a 360 degree, twenty-four-seven education in “thing”consciousness. What is not a “thing” either doesn’t exist or is simply imagined to be a ‘thing,’ like the atom. Like God. The end result? We recognise but do not see. The brain short-circuits. The brain, rightly assuming itself to be floating weightless in the dark, prefers recognition over seeing. It’s primary function being to convince itself that it is walking weightily in the light, the brain merely wants to know what is there. This is a footpath, that is a peach tree. I am now making love with my wife. Of course, it needs a minimum of information before it can recognise. But if the brain receives intelligence that what’s in front of it is a peach tree, it immediately superimposes the mental picture of a peach tree on top of reality, blanking out the tree, much in the same way that, given my tinnitus, I can no longer hear cicadas. To be conscious of an actual peach tree is of no particular importance to the brain. It only needs to know it is there and what it is.

In a nutshell? The brain don’t see too much. It needs glasses.

One obvious consequence of this is that it becomes very difficult to describe the world. It’s just so full of names.

Logically speaking, a “thing” as such can hardly be said to exist. It is a concept made up by The Lords Of Wandering Around In The Dark and spooned out to every infant from birth on. The concept of a “thing” is relative because nothing exists on its own.

In reality, if the human being were able to see, he or she would perceive nothing but relationships.
Intervals.
Erroneous dances of facts and angles.
Aches of any kind.

But if every single human being on the planet were able to see, would then all warring, all misunderstanding, all ugliness, hatred, stupidity, would all these be suddenly and irretrievably washed away by the overwhelming beauty of existence?
And when we looked back at our present lives after such a hypothetical flood, would we wonder what the fuss was all about?
Or then would we all starve to death, pretty much like the Neanderthals?

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